September 2019 Newsletter

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MS Newsletter Edition 4, September 2019
Martin Sean Logo
Martin Sean Image
This month I would like to introduce you to another new image, "Parched", that I have added to the Out of the Grey collection. The collection can currently be seen at Addenbrooke's Hospital in Cambridge where it is on display until October 2nd.

To view a larger image use this link direct to a hidden area on my website.

A reminder that for the duration that Out of the Grey is resident at Addenbrooke's hospital, I am having a sale on all my prints. With discounts of up to 50% and prices starting at only £75 for an exhibition quality print, it is an opportunity not to be missed!

Click this link for half price sale!

Martin Sean
Click for up to 50% off Prints

Addenbrooke's Exhibition

A little background to art in hospitals:

In recent years, a growing body of evidence has been compiled proving the value of the arts in healthcare settings. In 2007, The Department of Health issued its first ever review of arts in health which recognised that the arts “are, and should be firmly recognised as being, integral to health, healthcare provision and healthcare environments, including supporting staff”.

In fact I have witnessed this effect myself when I brought images to show a dear friend in hospital. The photos were partly from a shared trip we had been on and I simply hoped to remind her of happier times. More than that however, in the terminal stages of a painful disease she found escapism and joy. 

Recent research at Chelsea and Westminster Hospital found:

1) 75% of patients found the presence of art in the hospital reduced stress levels

2) Patients exposed to visual arts and live music during the preoperative process showed significantly lower levels of anxiety and depression than patients who were prepared for surgery in the absence of the arts

3) Patients exposed to visual art and live music during the post-operative period required less analgesia per day than patients recovering in the absence of visual art and live music. These patients also stayed 1 day less in hospital
 

Parched


Elephant (Loxodonta africana) – Etosha National Park, Namibia

Photographed in the dry season, the mud flaking off him mimics the parched earth on which he stands.

As the season wears on, just as the mud has dried and cracked so the rivers and water holes gradually disappear leaving islands of life concentrated around the little water that is left.

By digging down with their tusks elephants uncover water beneath the surface providing a critical lifeline for themselves and many other animals during these drought conditions.

Click here for larger image

Background:

This image was taken in the late afternoon at the water hole at Okaukuejo, in the heart of Etosha National Park. A fantastic spot to observe wildlife coming to drink, while relaxing with a sundowner yourself. Cheers!

Technical:

Taken with a Canon 1DX and Canon 300L II 2.8 at 1/800 second (ISO 200)

Technically this was not particularly demanding. However, with the narrow depth of field at f2.8, it was critical that the focus was precisely on the eye.

If you have any questions regarding the technical aspects of my photography please contact me directly using one of the links at the end of the newsletter.

 

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Another image uncovered

Capture to print: A brief background to my printing process

 
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August 2019 Newsletter

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MartinSean Newsletter Edition 3, August 2019
[IMAGE] Prowler
My focus this month is the opening of my exhibition at Addenbrooke's Hospital in Cambridge on the 7th August. I am proud to be exhibiting my photography for a second time this year and hope it brings joy to patients, staff and visitors alike.

As part of my exhibition at Addenbooke's, I am excited to be adding the above image, "Prowler", to my Out of the Grey collection. For a larger image use this link direct to a hidden area on my website.

Additionally, for the duration that Out of the Grey is resident at Addenbrooke's hospital I am having a sale on all my prints. With discounts of up to 50% and prices starting at only £75 for an exhibition quality print, it is an opportunity not to be missed!

Click this link for half price sale!

Prowler


Leopard (Panthera pardus) - South Luangwa National Park, Zambia
Click here for larger image

A truly spectacular encounter with a young leopard ascending and stalking guinea fowl resting at the top of the tree. She was composed, silent and purposeful, much in contrast to me, watching from below where I was full of anticipation and excitement. I was able to observe her from the initial moments on the ground until she reached the highest branches, where I lost sight of her. There was a long pause and then I heard her pounce. The guinea fowl scattered in a panic! Alas, she came down empty handed. She would have to go hungry for a little longer.

Background:

This image was taken from the back of an open top vehicle a few hours after the sun had gone down. I spent 45 minutes watching her, during which I captured some of my best leopard images from any single photo shoot. Trying to be as quiet as possible I was manoeuvring myself around in the vehicle, trying to get the best view. I was almost upside down in the footwell at one point! As a photographer it was fantastic, but as a lover of nature it was a simply magical experience.

Technical:

Taken with a Canon 1DX and Canon 300L II 2.8 at 1/60 second (ISO 6400), the key to this image was the lens. Fully open at f2.8 I was able to capture enough light and, with the image stabilisation, achieved a sharpness sufficient to develop this image right up to A0 (over 40x30 inches) in size.

If you have any questions please feel free to get in touch by email or using one of the links at the end of the newsletter.

Until next time,

Martin Sean

In the next newsletter
 

Another image uncovered

Addenbrooke's exhibition update

 
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July Newsletter

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MS Newsletter Edition 2, July 2019
Martin Sean Logo
Martin Sean Image
Hi,

Preparations for my photographic exhibition "Out of the Grey" at Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge are well underway. With three new prints being added to the collection there is much to be excited about.

In advance of the exhibition I am delighted to share this exclusive preview of "Fearless" with you.

For a larger image use this link direct to a hidden area on my website (works best on large screens):

 
Fearless Picture

Fearless


Chinstrap Penguins (Pygoscelis antarcticus)– Cierva Cove, Antarctica

The waves endlessly pound the rocks as the penguins advance towards the edge, the surf often enveloping them completely. They momentarily stop, judging the best moment to proceed and then launch themselves like missiles into the vast freezing ocean. Occasionally they pause a little longer to observe their primary nemesis - a hunting leopard seal stalking nearby, but they do not falter. Godspeed fearless ones!

Click here for larger image

Background:

Taken in February this year in Cierva Cove, Antarctica, the primary challenge in capturing this photo was keeping the subjects correctly framed. This was made exceedingly difficult by the amount of movement, not just of the penguins but also of our Zodiac which was constantly being thrown around in every conceivable dimension by the waves. Our driver and fantastic expedition leader, Kaylan, worked tirelessly to keep the boat in position as I fired off hundreds of shots of the penguins diving into the ocean. Out of all the of photos taken that afternoon this is the most dynamic and my clear favourite.

Technical:

Taken with my trusty Canon 1DX II and Canon 100-400L II at 1/4000th second (ISO 1250) to ensure the action was frozen and a f-stop of 7.1 to create sufficient depth of field to ensure all the penguins were in focus.

With a focal length of just 140mm I was very close to the action indeed.

If you have any questions at all please contact me directly using one of the links at the end of the newsletter.

A special thanks to my mum and dad who had opted to come along in the same Zodiac as me and for their patience for the hours we spent being bounced around that afternoon together.

In the next newsletter
 

Another image uncovered

More information on what I am up to next
 
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